Bonmots & Bullshit, 8/26

26 Aug 635897159225680692-1306698594_wknd

When you vow that you won’t get your hopes up about something, you will – just a little bit. That’s called “what if?” It’s natural, no matter how pessimistic you might be.

BLACK SABBATH are supposed to retire at the end of this year and their current tour. So it’s perfect timing for the October publication of a big, illustrated history of their entire career. Every era is covered in-depth – Ozzy, Dio, and the “lost” 80’s. Details are here.

So many times, it’s about the dialectical. Only I never knew it.

After 50 years, the most iconic passenger jet of all will be ending production. Goodbye, 747.

I should be old enough to know better. It’s remembering the better, in the midst of the noise, that’s the hard part

Favorite songs this week include Brice Springsteen’s “Roll of the Dice” and “Last Parade” by the Matthew Good Band. The former is an automatic mood-enhancer; the latter’s lyrics hit home.

Saw Jason Bourne earlier in the week. Mostly and of course, predictable, along with action-packed. This is the fourth installment with Matthew Damon, and there’s nowhere else the movies’ continuing story can go. He knows who he is now, he’s on the run, he knows what happened and what he did, and now knows how it started and that his dad was involved. That’s it. Or it should be.

Does anyone still need any proof that this guy is completely, utterly full of shit?

In April, at the worst, I vowed to make this summer fantastic, whether I was single or not. I’ve succeeded.

I’m a capitalist but there’s no way the outrageous price increase to the life-saving EpiPen can be justified. It’s about greed, pure and simple. That the CEO’s salary increased 671% increase since her company took over EpiPen is also telling. Looks like there will be Congressional hearings, which should be interesting given the CEO is the daughter of a U.S. senator. Being outraged isn’t being or anti-capitalism, it’s about empathy and common sense.

The End of the Boeing 747

25 Aug

If you’re an airplane buff, this is a big deal: the most iconic jetliner of them all, the first true wide-body passenger jet, the Boeimg 747, will finally end production in 2018 – 50 years after it was first introduced.

Growing up, and as an adult, the 747 always fascinated me. For me, there  was no more iconic or impressive jet than the 747. With its distinctive hump upper deck and it’s sheer size its easily the most recognizable airplane in the world. There’s a reason why it was dubbed “jumbo jet – it’s massive: most variants are overy 200 feet long, over 63′ high at the tail and it can weigh over 730,000 pounds, loaded, at takeoff. Whenever I fly, I’m always looking for 747s at the airport.

Alas, even the greatest passenger jet can be eclipsed by modern times and technology and thats why production of the 747 will finally end in 2018. More details are here.

 

COOL SONG: Bruce Springsteen – “Roll of the Dice”

25 Aug bruce-springsteen-roll-of-the-dice-1992-15-cs

Bruce Springsteen’s albums Human Touch and Lucky Town were both released on the same day in 1992 and I’ve always thought were unfairly maligned by critics and fans. No, the albums didn’t feature the E Street Band, but they’re both filled with great songs. One of my favorites from Human Touch is “Roll of the Dice.” This song never fails to lift me up. Here’s “Roll of the Dice” live from Zurich, Switzerland, 7/31/2016:

And just for fun, to hear guest vocalist  Sam Moore wail, here’s the original studio version:

 

And of course, don’t forget there’s a big new book out now, BOSS: BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN AND THE E STREET BAND – THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY

COOL SONG – Matthew Good: “Last Parade”

24 Aug
“LAST PARADE” by Matthew Good has been a long-time favorite – so has Matthew Good, actually. Spend some time to discover this Canadian artist who’s Matthew Good Band were big alternative rock stars in the 90’s in the Great White North. I’ve always loved this song…it just builds and builds, with that insurgent keyboard figure pulsing away in the verses, with a chorus that sneaks up on you.
Like so many of my favorite songs, I’ll hardly pay attention to the lyrics, just bits and pieces that standout to sing along to – and then, on the 40th listen, BAM!  The words hit home:
It feels like time to let it go
It feels like time to break or show
It feels like time to cut your brakes
Shut your mouth, do something, anything
It feels like time to fuck or leave
It feels like I’d choke you just to breathe
It feels like time aint time at all
Just black out, wake up foreign, wander home
I wander home
Take me out
Lay me down
Let the dirt
Fall all around me baby aint it
Good to be back home
Theyre burning futures in the mountains
Only look (?) and you can counts yours baby
Ain’t it good to be back home
LISTEN!!

How to Change Your Negative Attitude (When You Can’t Change Anything Else)

23 Aug wp-image-1890464150jpg.jpg

Smart article from a smart website
“Rather than focusing on the uncontrollable things…consider instead your part in what went down.”

“It’s so easy to be negative when things go wrong, or blame others for negative outcomes in your life.  But do negativity and blame change anything for the better?”

Life Lessons, Redux.

22 Aug

Came across a previous post, and thought it was worth another look and to cut and paste. So why not?

#LifeLessons Advice from an 80 year old man. 
1. Have a firm handshake.

2. Look people in the eye.

3. Sing in the shower.

4. Own a great stereo system.

5. If in a fight, hit first and hit hard.

6. Keep secrets.

7. Never give up on anybody. Miracles happen every day.

8. Always accept an outstretched hand.

9. Be brave. Even if you’re not, pretend to be. No one can tell the difference.

10. Whistle.

11. Avoid sarcastic remarks.

12. Choose your life’s mate carefully. From this one decision will come 90 per cent of all your happiness or misery.

13. Make it a habit to do nice things for people who will never find out.

14. Lend only those books you never care to see again.

15. Never deprive someone of hope; it might be all that they have.

16. When playing games with children, let them win.

17. Give people a second chance, but not a third.

18. Be romantic.

19. Become the most positive and enthusiastic person you know.

20. Loosen up. Relax. Except for rare life-and-death matters, nothing is as important as it first seems.

21. Don’t allow the phone to interrupt important moments. It’s there for our convenience, not the caller’s.

22. Be a good loser.

23. Be a good winner.

24. Think twice before burdening a friend with a secret.

25. When someone hugs you, let them be the first to let go.

26. Be modest. A lot was accomplished before you were born.

27. Keep it simple.

28. Beware of the person who has nothing to lose.

29. Don’t burn bridges. You’ll be surprised how many times you have to cross the same river.

30. Live your life so that your epitaph could read, No Regrets

31. Be bold and courageous. When you look back on life, you’ll regret the things you didn’t do more than the ones you did.

32. Never waste an opportunity to tell someone you love them.

33. Remember no one makes it alone. Have a grateful heart and be quick to acknowledge those who helped you.

34. Take charge of your attitude. Don’t let someone else choose it for you.

35. Visit friends and relatives when they are in hospital; you need only stay a few minutes.

36. Begin each day with some of your favorite music.

37. Once in a while, take the scenic route.

38. Send a lot of Valentine cards. Sign them, ‘Someone who thinks you’re terrific.’

39. Answer the phone with enthusiasm and energy in your voice.

40. Keep a note pad and pencil on your bed-side table. Million-dollar ideas sometimes strike at 3 a.m.

41. Show respect for everyone who works for a living, regardless of how trivial their job.

42. Send your loved ones flowers. Think of a reason later.

43. Make someone’s day by paying the toll for the person in the car behind you.

44. Become someone’s hero.

45. Marry only for love.

46. Count your blessings.

47. Compliment the meal when you’re a guest in someone’s home.

48. Wave at the children on a school bus.

49. Remember that 80 per cent of the success in any job is based on your ability to deal with people.

50. Don’t expect life to be fair

Matthew Broderick on Gilbert Gottfried’s Podcast

22 Aug 600x600bb.jpg

One of the many things I like about Gilbert Gottfried’s Amazing Colossal Podcast is that him and his co-host Frank Santopadre are huge film and TV buffs, especially for anything made in the 1970’s. So the 70’s were a big theme when Matthew Broderick was the guest in the current episode.

It’s easy when you think of Broderick to immediately think only of Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, but he’s done so much more than just that.Also impressive is the acting heavyweights he’s worked with with, including Jason Robards, Marlon Brando, Sean Connery, Sidney Lumet, Neil Simon, Mel Brooks, Christopher Walken, Bruno Kirby, and Nathan Lane, to name a few.

As always, there’s a lot of laughs (from the jump, when Gottfried tells Broderick that he “fucking hates” the movie Ferris Bueller). Broderick too is funny and tells some great stories about many of the greats listed above (complete with a Brando impersonation) as well as his dad, James Broderick, who was also an actor.  I especially love hearing about Walken as I’ve always loved him Broderick and him in Biloxi Blues. Trivia: what movie were Broderick and Gottfried in together?

#116: Matthew Broderick by Gilbert Gottfried’s Amazing Colossal Podcast

#nowplaying

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